Last edited by Vuk
Saturday, July 18, 2020 | History

7 edition of Pulmonary reactions to coal dust found in the catalog.

Pulmonary reactions to coal dust

a review of U.S. experience.

  • 115 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Academic Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lungs -- Dust diseases.,
  • Coal miners -- Diseases.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    StatementEdited by Marcus M. Key, Lorin E. Kerr [and] Merle Bundy.
    SeriesEnvironmental sciences
    ContributionsKey, Marcus M., ed., Kerr, Lorin E., 1909- ed., Bundy, Merle, ed.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsRC773 .P86 1971
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiv, 215 p.
    Number of Pages215
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5088251M
    ISBN 100124059503
    LC Control Number74159612

    Asbestos, silicon, talc, beryllium, and coal dust incite a fibrogenic tissue reaction throughout the lung. 13 Tin, barium, iron, and other inert particles do not incite fibrogenic changes but do cause particle-laden macrophages to accumulate in the lung. 14 These reactions are called benign pneumoconioses (even though their radiographic appearance can be dramatic) because they are less aggressive.   pulmonary and non-pulmonary diagnoses,” none of which “ha[ve] been caused by, contributed to, or substantially aggravated by coal mine dust exposure.”7 Id. At deposition, he added that the miner also had interstitial fibrosis and, although coal dust is one of the causes of interstitial fibrosis, it was not the cause in this case.

    Note that career coal miners could be exposed to levels of coal dust that have been linked to the development of severe emphysema. Explain to interested patients that research has shown that smoking cigarettes can lead to emphysema as severe as that caused by a lifetime of working as a coal miner. (5 mg) caused a lung tumor incidence of 15%. In contrast to a preceding study using a dose of 66 mg coal dust, lung tumors were not detected after exposure to the same coal dust at a dose of 10 mg in this study. Pulmonary inflammatory responses to coal dust were very low indicating a mechanistic threshold for the development of lung.

    Because CWP is a reaction to accumulated dust in the lungs, it may appear and get worse during your exposure to the dust or after your exposure has ceased. The severity of CWP depends on the type of coal dust, how much dust was in the air, and how long you have been exposed to it. Is CWP the same thing as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.   Anthracosilicosis: Description, Causes and Risk Factors:Pneumonoconiosis from accumulation of carbon and silica in the lungs from inhaled coal dust; the silica content produces fibrous cosilicosis is the asymptomatic accumulation of carbon without a consequent cellular accumulation can be found in varying degrees among most urban dwellers and in .


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Pulmonary reactions to coal dust Download PDF EPUB FB2

Pulmonary reactions to coal dust. A review of U.S. experience. This book is one of a series of monographs dealing with Environmental Sciences, although this particular volume in fact consists of a number of individual : M.

Key, L. Kerr, M. Bundy. Pulmonary reactions to coal dust. New York, Academic Press, (OCoLC) Online version: Pulmonary reactions to coal dust. New York, Academic Press, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Marcus M Key; Lorin E Kerr; Merle Bundy. Pulmonary reactions to coal dust: a review of U.S.

experience. Key MM, Kerr LE, Bundy M, eds. New York: Academic Press, Inc., Jan; Link NIOSHTIC No. Abstract Summary of the current knowledge of abnormalities of pulmonary function associated with coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Europe PMC is an ELIXIR Core Data Resource Learn more >. Europe PMC is a service of the Europe Pulmonary reactions to coal dust book Funders' Group, in partnership with the European Bioinformatics Institute; and in cooperation with the National Center for Biotechnology Information at the U.S.

National Library of Medicine (NCBI/NLM).It includes content provided to the PMC International archive by participating. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by : C.

McKerrow. Pulmonary Reactions to Coal Dust. A Review of U.S. Experience. Marcus M. Key, Lorin E. Kerr, and Merle Bundy, Eds. Academic Press, New York, xvi, pp., illus.

$Pulmonary reactions to coal dust; a review of U.S. experience. Edited by Marcus M. Key, Lorin E. Kerr [and] Merle Bundy Academic Press New York Wikipedia Citation.

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.

Pulmonary reactions to coal dust: A review of U. experience, Eds. Academic Press, New York,pp. Coal burning was associated with increased wheezing, whereas living with smokers was associated with increased cough and phlegm production.

Coal burning produces high concentrations of particulate matter, SO 2, and other pollutants [2,3,11]. Exposure to these pollutants may impair clearance mechanisms, and lead to airway inflammation [21,22].

Sorry, our data provider has not provided any external links therefor we are unable to provide a PDF. Pay Attention to Books' Deadly Dust. Relationship of Lung Cancer and Heart Attack to Library Books' Dust. By Hassan Bolourchi, Ph.D. [email protected] This article is presented at: The 6th edition of the Indoor Air Quality Meeting (IAQ) in Padova, Italy.

10 to 12 November Health Hazard. (Book Reviews: Pulmonary Reactions to Coal Dust. A Review of U.S. Experience).

Exposure to toxins like asbestos, or coal dust or silica (including workers in the coal mining and sandblasting industry) can lead to pulmonary fibrosis.

There are medications known to have a side effect of pulmonary fibrosis (amiodarone, bleomycin, nitrofurantoin, to name a few). Coal miners have been shown to be at increased risk of developing chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases including emphysema.

The objective of this study was to determine whether lifetime cumulative exposure to respirable coal mine dust is a significant predictor of developing emphysema at a clinically-relevant level of severity by the end of life, after controlling for cigarette smoking and.

Pulmonary inflammatory responses to coal dust were very low indicating a mechanistic threshold for the development of lung tumors connected with particle related chronic inflammation.

The Patilla Coal Pit at the Cerrejón mine. From this foot deep pit,tons of coal are extracted every month. Daily explosions damage the structure of neighboring houses and spread coal dust. Respiratory diseases are common among those who live close to the mine.

Coal mining remains a sizable industry, with millions of working and retired coal miners worldwide. This article provides an update on recent advances in the understanding of respiratory health issues in coal miners and focuses on the spectrum of disease caused by inhalation of coal mine dust, termed coal mine dust lung disease.

Antinuclear antibodies have been found to be present in interstitial pulmonary fibrosis and subsequently in asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis.1, 2 Lippmann et al 3 found 53 of (34 percent) eastern coal miners to have ANA.

These were almost entirely (51 of 53) among those with CWP, and IgG was the reactant globulin in. Coal worker's pneumoconiosis is a lung disease that results from breathing in dust from coal, graphite, or man-made carbon over a long time.

Causes Coal worker's pneumoconiosis occurs in two forms: simple and complicated (also called progressive massive fibrosis, or PMF). Black lung refers to lung disease caused by inhaling coal dust. The medical term coal workers pneumoconiosis (CWP).

Black lung comes from the fact that the lungs of deceased coal miners often appear black from the heavy deposits of coal.

The normal human lung has a healthy pink appearance.Exposure to coal mine dust causes various pulmonary diseases, including coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 2. Coal miners are also exposed to crystalline silica dust, which causes silicosis, COPD, and other diseases.

3. These lung diseases can bring about impairment, disability and premature death.Coal dust is relatively inert, and large amounts must be deposited in the lungs before lung disease is clinically detectable.

Silica, asbestos, and beryllium are more reactive than coal dust, resulting in fibrotic reactions at lower concentrations.